Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author: Yu Ren x
Clear All Modify Search
Yu Ren Department of Pharmacy, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Yu Ren in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Hui Yu Department of Hematology, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China
Department of Hematology, Enze Hospital, Taizhou Enze Medical Center (Group), Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Hui Yu in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Zhangfu Wang Department of Orthopedics, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Zhangfu Wang in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Wenjun Pan Department of Orthopedics, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Wenjun Pan in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Lin Chen Department of Orthopedics, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Lin Chen in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Hua Luo Department of Orthopedics, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Hua Luo in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Purpose

  • For many decades, patients recovering from wound closure have been instructed not to bathe. Although studies have shown that earlier postoperative bathing does not increase the risk of wound infection, it remains rare in practice for patients to be allowed earlier postoperative bathing. We performed this meta-analysis to determine how earlier bathing affected rates of wound infection, other complications, and patient satisfaction.

Methods

  • This systematic review conforms to PRISMA guidelines. The PubMed, EMBASE, Medline, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from their inception dates to December 31, 2022. We estimated pooled values for the efficacy of trial of earlier bathing versus delayed bathing using the odds ratio and their associated 95% CI, and we used the I 2 statistic to assess heterogeneity between studies contributing to these estimates.

Results

  • Of the 1813 articles identified by our search, 11 randomized controlled trials including 2964 patients were eligible for inclusion. The incidence of wound infection did not differ significantly between the earlier bathing and delayed bathing groups, nor did rates of other wound complications such as redness and swelling, or wound dehiscence. However, the incidence of hematoma in the delayed bathing group was higher than in the earlier bathing group. Reported patient satisfaction was significantly higher in the earlier bathing group.

Conclusion

  • The medical community, health authorities, and government should create and disseminate clinical practice guidelines to guide patients to evidence-based beneficial treatment.

Open access
Hua Luo Department of Orthopedics, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province Affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Hua Luo in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Chaojun Shen Department of Orthopedics, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province Affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Chaojun Shen in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Tongyou Qu Department of Pharmacy, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province Affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang China

Search for other papers by Tongyou Qu in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Lin Chen Department of Orthopedics, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province Affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Lin Chen in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Yue Sun Department of Orthopedics, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province Affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Yue Sun in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Yu Ren Department of Pharmacy, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province Affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang China

Search for other papers by Yu Ren in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

  • Convulsions are a neurological illness that has complexity. In clinical treatment, drug-induced convulsions appear from time to time. Drug-induced convulsions often begin as isolated acute seizures but may progress to persistent seizures. In orthopedics, topical administration of tranexamic acid is commonly used in conjunction with intravenous drip to achieve hemostasis during artificial joint replacement surgery. However, side effects induced by tranexamic acid accidental spinal administration should be taken seriously.

  • We report a case of a middle-aged male treated with tranexamic acid locally in combination with intravenous drip for intraoperative hemostasis when undergoing spinal surgery. The patient had involuntary convulsions in both lower limbs after the operation. After symptomatic administration, the symptoms of convulsions gradually resolved. During the follow-up, the convulsions never occurred again. We reviewed the literature on cases with side effects of local tranexamic acid application in spinal surgery and discussed the mechanism of tranexamic acid-induced convulsions.

  • Tranexamic acid is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative seizures. However, many clinicians are unaware that tranexamic acid causes seizures. This rare case summarized the risk factors and clinical features of these seizures. Moreover, it highlights several clinical and preclinical studies that offer mechanistic insights into the potential causes and treatments for tranexamic acid-associated seizures. A clear understanding of tranexamic acid-induced convulsions-related adverse reactions can help the first-line clinical screening of causes and adjustment of drug treatment. This review will aid the medical community by increasing awareness about tranexamic acid-associated seizures and translating scientific findings into therapeutic interventions for patients.

Open access
Hua Luo Department of Orthopaedics, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Hua Luo in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Yu Ren Department of Pharmacy, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Yu Ren in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Yongwei Su The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinzhou Medical University, Jinzhou, Liaoning, China

Search for other papers by Yongwei Su in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Feng Xue Department of Orthopaedics, Fengxian District Central Hospital, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

Search for other papers by Feng Xue in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Zhenghua Hong Department of Orthopaedics, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Zhenghua Hong in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

  • The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of local application of vancomycin powder (VP) to prevent surgical site infections (SSIs) after posterior spine surgery.

  • A comprehensive search of Web of Science, EMBASE, Pubmed, Ovid, and Cochrane Library databases for articles published was performed to collect comparative studies of intrawound vancomycin in posterior spine surgery before March 2021. Two reviewers independently screened eligible articles based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria, assessed the study quality, and extracted the data. Revman 5.4 software was used for data analysis.

  • A total of 22 articles encompassing 11 555 surgical patients were finally identified for meta-analysis. According to the information provided by the included literature, the combined odds ratio showed that topical use of VP was effective for reducing the incidence of SSIs (P< 0.00001) after posterior spine surgery without affecting its efficacy in the treatment of deep infections (P< 0.00001). However, there is no statistical significance in superficial infections. In a subgroup analysis, VP at a dose of 1, 2, and 0.5–2 g reduced the incidence of spinal SSIs. The result of another subgroup analysis suggested that local application of VP could significantly reduce the risk of SSIs, whether it was administered after posterior cervical surgery or thoracolumbar surgery. Moreover, the percentage of SSIs due to gram-positive germs (P< 0.00001) and MRSA (P< 0.0001) could reduce after intraoperative VP was used, but did not significantly reduce to gram-negative germs.

  • The local application of VP appears to protect against SSIs, gram-positive germs, and MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) infections after the posterior spinal operation.

Open access
Hua Luo Department of Orthopedic, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Hua Luo in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Xueli Yan Department of Orthopedic, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Xueli Yan in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Yu Ren Department of Pharmacy, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Yu Ren in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Han Zhang Department of Orthopedic, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Han Zhang in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Wenjun Pan Department of Orthopedic, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Wenjun Pan in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Purpose

  • This meta-analysis aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of tranexamic acid (TXA) in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), focusing on its impact on intraoperative blood loss and related outcomes.

Methods

  • The review process was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Medline, and Cochrane Library databases to identify all literature related with TXA and TLIF. Finally, five trials ultimately meeting the inclusion criteria. Continuous variables were analyzed using mean difference and categorical variables were analyzed using Peto odds ratio, via random effects models.

Results

  • The meta-analysis revealed a significant reduction in intraoperative blood loss associated with TXA use during TLIF, as confirmed by the RCTs. However, the impact of TXA on other outcomes, such as postoperative drainage volume, total blood loss, and length of hospital stay, remains inconclusive due to limited data. No severe complications related to TXA use were reported, providing preliminary evidence of its safety in TLIF.

Conclusion

  • TXA appears to effectively reduce intraoperative blood loss in TLIF, based on the available RCT evidence. However, further research is needed to provide a comprehensive assessment of TXA’s overall impact on various outcomes in this context. This meta-analysis underscores the importance of ongoing investigation to establish the full potential and safety profile of TXA in TLIF procedures.

Open access