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  • Author: Rocco D’Apolito x
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Luigi Zagra Hip Department, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Milan, Italy

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Francesco Benazzo Chirurgia Protesica ad Indirizzo Robotico, Fondazione Poliambulanza, Brescia, Italy

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Dante Dallari Reconstructive Orthopaedic Surgery and Innovative Techniques – Musculoskeletal Tissue Bank, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy

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Francesco Falez Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, ASL Roma 1, S. Filippo Neri Hospital, Rome, Italy

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Giuseppe Solarino Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Neuroscience and Sense Organs, Orthopaedic & Trauma Unit, School of Medicine, University of Bari Aldo Moro, AOU Consorziale ‘Policlinico’, Bari, Italy

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Rocco D’Apolito Hip Department, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Milan, Italy

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Claudio Carlo Castelli FROM, Research Foundation Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Bergamo, Italy

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  • Hip, spine, and pelvis move in coordination with one another during activity, forming the lumbopelvic complex (LPC).

  • These movements are characterized by the spinopelvic parameters sacral slope, pelvic tilt, and pelvic incidence, which define a patient’s morphotype.

  • LPC kinematics may be classified by various systems, the most comprehensive of which is the Bordeaux Classification.

  • Hip–spine relationships in total hip arthroplasty (THA) may influence impingement, dislocation, and edge loading.

  • Historical ‘safe zones’ may not apply to patients with impaired spinopelvic mobility; adjustment of cup inclination and version and stem version may be necessary to achieve functional orientation and avert complications.

  • Stem design, bearing surface (including dual mobility), and head size are part of the armamentarium to treat abnormal hip–spine relationships.

  • Special attention should be directed to patients with adult spine deformity or fused spine because they are at increased risk of complications after THA.

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