Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author: Martin Stevens x
Clear All Modify Search
Wout Füssenich Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands

Search for other papers by Wout Füssenich in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Gesine H Seeber Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
University Hospital for Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery Pius-Hospital, Medical Campus University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany

Search for other papers by Gesine H Seeber in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Julian R Zwoferink Center for Human Movement Sciences, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands

Search for other papers by Julian R Zwoferink in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Matthijs P Somford Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rijnstate Hospital, Arnhem, The Netherlands

Search for other papers by Matthijs P Somford in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Martin Stevens Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands

Search for other papers by Martin Stevens in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Purpose

  • A systematic review to determine the effect of different types of joint preparation, joint fixation, and postoperative weight-bearing protocols on non-union frequency in first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) arthrodesis in patients with moderate-to-severe hallux valgus.

Material and methods

  • A systematic literature search (PubMed and EMBASE), adhering to PRISMA guidelines. Data on MTPJ preparation, fixation, weight-bearing, and non-union in patients with moderate-to-severe hallux valgus were collected. Quality assessment was performed using the Coleman Methodology Score.

Results

  • Sixteen studies (934 feet) were included, generally of medium quality. Overall non-union rate was 7.7%. At 6.3%, convex/concave joint preparation had the lowest non-union rate vs 12.2% for hand instruments and 22.2% for planar cuts. Non-union of 2.8% was found for joint fixation with a plate combined with a lag screw vs 6.5% for plate fixation, 11.1% for crossed screw fixation, and 12.5% for a plate with a cross plate compression screw. A 5.1% non-union frequency was found following postoperative full weight-bearing on a flat shoe vs 9.3% for full weight-bearing on a heel weight-bearing shoe and 0% for a partial weight-bearing regimen.

Conclusion

  • Based on medium-quality papers, joint preparation with convex/concave reamers and joint fixation with a plate using a lag screw show the lowest non-union rate. Full postoperative weight-bearing in a stiff-soled postoperative shoe is safe and not associated with non-union vs a more protective load-bearing regimen. Further research should focus on larger sample sizes, longer follow-ups, and stronger study designs.

Open access
Yvet Mooiweer Department of Health Services Research, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg, Germany
Department of Orthopedics, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands

Search for other papers by Yvet Mooiweer in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Lina Roling School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg, Germany

Search for other papers by Lina Roling in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Margaret Vugrin Preston Smith Library, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lobbock, Texas, USA

Search for other papers by Margaret Vugrin in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Lena Ansmann Department of Health Services Research, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg, Germany
Chair of Medical Sociology, Institute of Medical Sociology, Health Services Research and Rehabilitation Science (IMVR) Faculty of Medicine, University of Cologne, Oldenburg, Germany

Search for other papers by Lena Ansmann in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Martin Stevens Department of Orthopedics, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands

Search for other papers by Martin Stevens in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Gesine H Seeber Department of Orthopedics, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
University Hospital of Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery Pius-Hospital, Medical Campus University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany

Search for other papers by Gesine H Seeber in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Purpose

  • The association between preoperative expectations and treatment outcomes in total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is still unclear. Therefore the aim is to examine the association between preoperative outcome expectations, process expectations, and self-efficacy, and the postoperative outcomes overall outcome, pain, function, stiffness, satisfaction, and quality of life following THA/TKA.

Methods

  • A systematic review with narrative synthesis was conducted. PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and Cochrane Library were searched from inception to October 17, 2022. Included were prospective longitudinal cohort studies published in English, German, or Dutch, with an adult population undergoing THA/TKA, and including at least one measure of preoperative expectations and the postoperative outcomes mentioned earlier. Two independent reviewers screened the retrieved articles for eligibility, a third solved disagreements. Risk of bias (RoB) was assessed using the QUIPS tool.

Results

  • Of the 50 included studies, 38 had high RoB and 12 moderate RoB. Unadjusted results suggest a positive association between preoperative outcome expectations and overall outcome in the medium and long term, and between self-efficacy and change in ‘overall outcome’ in the long term. Adjusted results suggest positive associations between outcome expectations and function and between self-efficacy and overall outcome in the medium term, and for outcome expectations with pain and change in pain, respectively, and self-efficacy and stiffness in the long term.

Conclusions

  • Preoperative expectations show a possible positive association with specific outcome measures, such as pain or function. For future research, it is advised to link matching specific expectations with specific outcomes.

Open access