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  • Author: Hui Yu x
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Yu Ren Department of Pharmacy, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

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Hui Yu Department of Hematology, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China
Department of Hematology, Enze Hospital, Taizhou Enze Medical Center (Group), Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

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Zhangfu Wang Department of Orthopedics, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

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Wenjun Pan Department of Orthopedics, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

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Lin Chen Department of Orthopedics, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

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Hua Luo Department of Orthopedics, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

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Purpose

  • For many decades, patients recovering from wound closure have been instructed not to bathe. Although studies have shown that earlier postoperative bathing does not increase the risk of wound infection, it remains rare in practice for patients to be allowed earlier postoperative bathing. We performed this meta-analysis to determine how earlier bathing affected rates of wound infection, other complications, and patient satisfaction.

Methods

  • This systematic review conforms to PRISMA guidelines. The PubMed, EMBASE, Medline, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from their inception dates to December 31, 2022. We estimated pooled values for the efficacy of trial of earlier bathing versus delayed bathing using the odds ratio and their associated 95% CI, and we used the I 2 statistic to assess heterogeneity between studies contributing to these estimates.

Results

  • Of the 1813 articles identified by our search, 11 randomized controlled trials including 2964 patients were eligible for inclusion. The incidence of wound infection did not differ significantly between the earlier bathing and delayed bathing groups, nor did rates of other wound complications such as redness and swelling, or wound dehiscence. However, the incidence of hematoma in the delayed bathing group was higher than in the earlier bathing group. Reported patient satisfaction was significantly higher in the earlier bathing group.

Conclusion

  • The medical community, health authorities, and government should create and disseminate clinical practice guidelines to guide patients to evidence-based beneficial treatment.

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Shu-Hao Du Department of Sport Rehabilitation, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Shanghai University of Medicine and Health Sciences Affiliated Zhoupu Hospital, Shanghai, China

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Yong-Hui Zhang Department of Sport Rehabilitation, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China

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Qi-Hao Yang Department of Sport Rehabilitation, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China

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Yu-Chen Wang Department of Sport Rehabilitation, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China

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Yu Fang Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Shanghai University of Medicine and Health Sciences Affiliated Zhoupu Hospital, Shanghai, China

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Xue-Qiang Wang Department of Sport Rehabilitation, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Shanghai University of Medicine and Health Sciences Affiliated Zhoupu Hospital, Shanghai, China

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  • Postural assessment can help doctors and therapists identify risk factors for low back pain and determine appropriate follow-up treatment.

  • Postural alignment is not perfectly symmetrical, and small asymmetries can instead represent norms and criteria for postural evaluation.

  • It is necessary to comprehensively observe patients’ posture in all directions and analyze the factors related to posture evaluation.

  • The results of reliability show that in general intra-rater reliability is higher than inter-rater reliability, and inclinometers are being more reliable than other instrumentations.

  • Some common postural problems can cause lumbar discomfort, and prolonged poor posture is a potential risk factor for lumbar spine injuries.

  • On the basis of previous studies on posture evaluation, a unified standardized method for posture evaluation must be established in future research.

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