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  • Author: Doruk Akgün x
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Alp Paksoy Charité University Hospital, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Augustenburger Platz 1, Berlin, Germany

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Doruk Akgün Charité University Hospital, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Augustenburger Platz 1, Berlin, Germany

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Sebastian Lappen Schulthess Klinik, Lengghalde 2, Zurich, Switzerland

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Philipp Moroder Schulthess Klinik, Lengghalde 2, Zurich, Switzerland

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  • Posterior shoulder instability (PSI) is less common than anterior shoulder instability, accounting for 2–12% of total shoulder instability cases.

  • However, a much higher frequency of PSI has been recently indicated, suggesting that PSI accounts for up to 24% of all young and active patients who are surgically treated for shoulder instability.

  • This differentiation might be explained due to the frequent misinterpretation of vague symptoms, as PSI does not necessarily present as a recurrent posterior instability event, but often also as mere shoulder pain during exertion, limited range of motion, or even as yet asymptomatic concomitant finding.

  • In order to optimize current treatment, it is crucial to identify the various clinical presentations and often unspecific symptoms of PSI, ascertain the causal instability mechanism, and accurately diagnose the subgroup of PSI.

  • This review should guide the reader to correctly identify PSI, providing diagnostic criteria and treatment strategies.

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