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  • Author: Alessandro Sangiorgio x
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Lorenzo Massimo Oldrini Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Surgery, EOC, Lugano, Switzerland

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Alessandro Sangiorgio Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Surgery, EOC, Lugano, Switzerland

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Pietro Feltri Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Surgery, EOC, Lugano, Switzerland

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Francesco Marbach Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Surgery, EOC, Lugano, Switzerland

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Giuseppe Filardo Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Surgery, EOC, Lugano, Switzerland
Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Università della Svizzera italiana, Lugano, Switzerland

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Christian Candrian Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Surgery, EOC, Lugano, Switzerland
Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Università della Svizzera italiana, Lugano, Switzerland

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Purpose

  • To compare the two main surgical approaches to address proximal humerus fractures (PHFs) stratified for Neer fracture types, to demonstrate which approach gives the best result for each fracture type.

Methods

  • A literature search was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines in PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases up to 4 January 2022. Inclusion criteria were studies comparing open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) with deltopectoral (DP) approach and minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) with deltosplit (DS) approach of PHFs. Patient’s demographic data, fracture type, Constant–Murley Score (CMS), operation time, blood loss, length of hospital stay, complications, fluoroscopy time, and radiological outcomes were extracted. Results were stratified for each type of Neer fracture.

Results

  • Eleven studies (798 patients) were included in the meta-analysis. No functional difference was found in the CMS between the two groups for each type of Neer (P = n.s.): for PHFs Neer II, the mean CMS was 72.5 (s.e. 5.9) points in the ORIF group and 79.6 (s.e. 2.5) points in the MIPO group; for Neer III, 77.8 (s.e. 2.0) in the ORIF and 76.4 (se 3.0) in the MIPO; and for Neer IV, 70.6 (s.e. 2.7) in the ORIF and 60.9 (s.e. 6.3) in the MIPO. The operation time in the MIPO group was significantly lower than in the ORIF group for both Neer II (P = 0.0461) and Neer III (P = 0.0037) fractures.

Conclusion

  • The MIPO with DS approach demonstrated no significant differences in the results to the ORIF with DP approach for the different Neer fractures in terms of functional results, with a similar outcome, especially for the Neer II and III fracture types. The MIPO technique proved to be as safe and effective as the ORIF approach.

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Alessandro Sangiorgio Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Surgery, EOC, Lugano, Switzerland

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Martina Sirone Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Surgery, EOC, Lugano, Switzerland

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Federico Maria Adravanti Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Surgery, EOC, Lugano, Switzerland
2nd Orthopaedic and Traumatologic Clinic, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy

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Enrique Adrian Testa Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Surgery, EOC, Lugano, Switzerland
Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Università della Svizzera Italiana, Lugano, Switzerland

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Martin Riegger Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Surgery, EOC, Lugano, Switzerland
Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Università della Svizzera Italiana, Lugano, Switzerland

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Giuseppe Filardo Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Surgery, EOC, Lugano, Switzerland
2nd Orthopaedic and Traumatologic Clinic, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy

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Purpose

  • The association between fluoroquinolone intake and Achilles tendinopathy (AT) or Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) is widely documented. However, it is not clear whether different molecules have the same effect on these complications. The purpose of this study was to document Achilles tendon complications for the most prescribed fluoroquinolones molecules.

Methods

  • A literature search was performed on Pubmed, Cochrane, Embase, and Web of Science databases up to April 2023. Inclusion criteria: studies of any level of evidence, written in English, documenting the prevalence of AT/ATR after fluoroquinolone consumption and stratifying the results for each type of molecule. The Downs and Black’s ‘Checklist for Measuring Quality’ was used to evaluate the risk of bias.

Results

  • Twelve studies investigating 439,299 patients were included (59.7% women, 40.3% men, mean age: 53.0 ± 15.6 years). The expected risk of AT/ATR was 0.17% (95% CI: 0.15–0.19, standard error (s.e.): 0.24) for levofloxacin, 0.17% (95% CI: 0.16–0.19, s.e.: 0.20) for ciprofloxacin, 1.40% (95% CI: 0.88–2.03, s.e.: 2.51) for ofloxacin, and 0.31% (95% CI: 0.23–0.40, s.e.: 0.77) for the other molecules. The comparison between groups documented a significantly higher AT/ATR rate in the ofloxacin group (P < 0.0001 for each comparison). Levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin showed the same risk (P = n.s.). The included studies showed an overall good quality.

Conclusion

  • Ofloxacin demonstrated a significantly higher rate of AT/ATR complications in the adult population, while levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin showed a safer profile compared to all the other molecules. More data are needed to identify other patient and treatment-related factors influencing the risk of musculoskeletal complications.

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