Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 741 items

Alessandro Sangiorgio Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Surgery, EOC, Lugano, Switzerland

Search for other papers by Alessandro Sangiorgio in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Martina Sirone Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Surgery, EOC, Lugano, Switzerland

Search for other papers by Martina Sirone in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Federico Maria Adravanti Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Surgery, EOC, Lugano, Switzerland
2nd Orthopaedic and Traumatologic Clinic, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy

Search for other papers by Federico Maria Adravanti in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Enrique Adrian Testa Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Surgery, EOC, Lugano, Switzerland
Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Università della Svizzera Italiana, Lugano, Switzerland

Search for other papers by Enrique Adrian Testa in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Martin Riegger Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Surgery, EOC, Lugano, Switzerland
Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Università della Svizzera Italiana, Lugano, Switzerland

Search for other papers by Martin Riegger in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Giuseppe Filardo Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Surgery, EOC, Lugano, Switzerland
2nd Orthopaedic and Traumatologic Clinic, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy

Search for other papers by Giuseppe Filardo in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Purpose

  • The association between fluoroquinolone intake and Achilles tendinopathy (AT) or Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) is widely documented. However, it is not clear whether different molecules have the same effect on these complications. The purpose of this study was to document Achilles tendon complications for the most prescribed fluoroquinolones molecules.

Methods

  • A literature search was performed on Pubmed, Cochrane, Embase, and Web of Science databases up to April 2023. Inclusion criteria: studies of any level of evidence, written in English, documenting the prevalence of AT/ATR after fluoroquinolone consumption and stratifying the results for each type of molecule. The Downs and Black’s ‘Checklist for Measuring Quality’ was used to evaluate the risk of bias.

Results

  • Twelve studies investigating 439,299 patients were included (59.7% women, 40.3% men, mean age: 53.0 ± 15.6 years). The expected risk of AT/ATR was 0.17% (95% CI: 0.15–0.19, standard error (s.e.): 0.24) for levofloxacin, 0.17% (95% CI: 0.16–0.19, s.e.: 0.20) for ciprofloxacin, 1.40% (95% CI: 0.88–2.03, s.e.: 2.51) for ofloxacin, and 0.31% (95% CI: 0.23–0.40, s.e.: 0.77) for the other molecules. The comparison between groups documented a significantly higher AT/ATR rate in the ofloxacin group (P < 0.0001 for each comparison). Levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin showed the same risk (P = n.s.). The included studies showed an overall good quality.

Conclusion

  • Ofloxacin demonstrated a significantly higher rate of AT/ATR complications in the adult population, while levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin showed a safer profile compared to all the other molecules. More data are needed to identify other patient and treatment-related factors influencing the risk of musculoskeletal complications.

Open access
Kashif Ansari Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA

Search for other papers by Kashif Ansari in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Manjot Singh Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA

Search for other papers by Manjot Singh in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Jake R McDermott Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA
SUNY Downstate Medical School, New York City, New York, USA

Search for other papers by Jake R McDermott in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Jerzy A Gregorczyk Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA

Search for other papers by Jerzy A Gregorczyk in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Mariah Balmaceno-Criss Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA

Search for other papers by Mariah Balmaceno-Criss in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Mohammad Daher Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA

Search for other papers by Mohammad Daher in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Christopher L McDonald Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA

Search for other papers by Christopher L McDonald in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Bassel G Diebo Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA

Search for other papers by Bassel G Diebo in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Alan H Daniels Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA

Search for other papers by Alan H Daniels in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

  • Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is an abnormal coronal curvature of the spine that most commonly presents in adolescence.

  • While it may be asymptomatic, AIS can cause pain, cosmetic deformity, and physical and psychological disability with curve progression.

  • As adolescents with AIS enter adulthood, condition outcomes vary with some experiencing curve stabilization and others noting further curve progression, chronic pain, osteoporosis/fractures, declines in pulmonary and functional capacity, among others.

  • Regular monitoring and individualized management by healthcare professionals are crucial to address the diverse challenges and provide appropriate support for a fulfilling adult life with AIS.

  • This review examines the prevalence, risk factors, presenting symptoms, diagnosis, management, and complications of AIS in the adult population, informing targeted interventions by clinicians caring for adult patients with AIS.

Open access
David Eckerdal Department of Orthopedics, Hässleholm-Kristianstad Hospitals, Hässleholm, Sweden
Department of Clinical Sciences - Orthopedics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden

Search for other papers by David Eckerdal in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Hendrik Pakosta Department of Orthopedics, Hässleholm-Kristianstad Hospitals, Hässleholm, Sweden

Search for other papers by Hendrik Pakosta in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Muhanned Ali Department of Orthopedics, Hässleholm-Kristianstad Hospitals, Hässleholm, Sweden
Department of Clinical Sciences - Orthopedics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden

Search for other papers by Muhanned Ali in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Isam Atroshi Department of Orthopedics, Hässleholm-Kristianstad Hospitals, Hässleholm, Sweden
Department of Clinical Sciences - Orthopedics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden

Search for other papers by Isam Atroshi in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Purpose

  • Controversy exists regarding the comparative efficacy of collagenase injection and percutaneous needle fasciotomy in the treatment of Dupuytren contracture. The randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that have compared the two treatment methods have reported results mostly implying similar treatment efficacy, durability, and complications. We aimed to review these RCTs regarding methodical quality and risk of bias.

Methods

  • We searched PubMed and Cochrane Library databases up to May 2023. All RCTs comparing collagenase injection with needle fasciotomy were included. Eligible articles were reviewed by two researchers, of whom one was blinded to each article’s title, authors, year of publication, journal, and source of the studies. To assess methodical quality, we used the modified Jadad scale yielding a score of 0 (lowest quality) to 5 (highest quality). We assessed risk of bias with the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool (RoB 2).

Results

  • Five studies were eligible, comprising 204 patients treated with collagenase injection and 209 patients treated with needle fasciotomy. The modified Jadad score ranged from 1 to 2 points in the five studies, and the overall risk of bias was high in all studies. Pretrial protocols could be retrieved for only two studies, revealing important discrepancies with the published articles.

Conclusion

  • The published RCTs that have compared collagenase injection with needle fasciotomy in the treatment of Dupuytren contracture demonstrate a high risk of bias.

Open access
Mara Meyer Günderoth Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Berlin, Germany
Berlin Institute of Health at Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Julius Wolff Institute, Berlin, Germany

Search for other papers by Mara Meyer Günderoth in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Alexandra Bannach-Brown Berlin Institute of Health at Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, QUEST Center for Responsible Research, Berlin, Germany

Search for other papers by Alexandra Bannach-Brown in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Tobias Winkler Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Berlin, Germany
Berlin Institute of Health at Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Julius Wolff Institute, Berlin, Germany
Berlin Institute of Health at Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin Institute of Health Center for Regenerative Therapies, Berlin, Germany

Search for other papers by Tobias Winkler in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Johannes Keller Department of Trauma and Orthopedic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany

Search for other papers by Johannes Keller in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Robert Karl Zahn Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Berlin, Germany

Search for other papers by Robert Karl Zahn in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Tazio Maleitzke Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Berlin, Germany
Berlin Institute of Health at Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Julius Wolff Institute, Berlin, Germany
Trauma Orthopaedic Research Copenhagen Hvidovre (TORCH), Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Copenhagen University Hospital – Amager and Hvidovre, Hvidovre, Denmark
Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

Search for other papers by Tazio Maleitzke in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Purpose

  • The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of calcitonin (CT) in animal models of experimental osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as new stabilized CT formulations are currently being introduced.

Methods

  • A comprehensive and systemic literature search was conducted in PubMed/MEDLINE and Embase databases to identify articles with original data on CT treatment of preclinical OA and RA. Methodological quality was assessed using the Systematic Review Centre for Laboratory Animal Experimentation’s risk of bias tool for animal intervention studies. To provide summary estimates of efficacy, a meta-analysis was conducted for outcomes reported in four or more studies, using a random-effects model. Subgroup analyses were employed to correct for study specifics.

Results

  • Twenty-six studies were ultimately evaluated and data from 16 studies could be analyzed in the meta-analysis, which included the following outcomes: bone mineral density, bone volume, levels of cross-linked C-telopeptide of type I collagen, histopathological arthritis score, and mechanical allodynia. For all considered outcome parameters, CT-treated groups were significantly superior to control groups (P = 0.002; P = 0.01; P < 0.00001; P < 0.00001; P = 0.04). For most outcomes, effect sizes were significantly greater in OA than in RA (P ≤ 0.025). High in-between study heterogeneity was detected.

Conclusion

  • There is preclinical evidence for an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, cartilage- and bone-protective effect of CT in RA and OA. Given these effects, CT presents a promising agent for the treatment of both diseases, although the potential seems to be greater in OA.

Open access
Hsiao-Yi Cheng Department of Primary Care Medicine, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan

Search for other papers by Hsiao-Yi Cheng in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Chun-Wei Liang School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan
Department of Primary Care Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan

Search for other papers by Chun-Wei Liang in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Yu-Hao Lee Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan

Search for other papers by Yu-Hao Lee in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Timporn Vitoonpong Department of Rehabilitation, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bankok, Thailand

Search for other papers by Timporn Vitoonpong in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Chun-De Liao Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan
Master’s Program in Long-Term Care, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan

Search for other papers by Chun-De Liao in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Shih-Wei Huang Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan

Search for other papers by Shih-Wei Huang in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Purpose

  • The combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions is strongly recommended by current guidelines for knee osteoarthritis. However, few systematic reviews have validated their combined efficacy. In this study, we investigated the effects of the combination of pharmacological agents and exercise on knee osteoarthritis.

Methods

  • Randomized controlled trials that investigated the efficacy of pharmacological agents combined with exercise for knee osteoarthritis were searched in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library up to February 2024. The network meta-analysis was performed within the frequentist framework. Standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% CI was estimated for pain and function. Grading of recommendations, assessment, development, and evaluations were used to evaluate the certainty of evidence.

Results

  • In total, 71 studies were included. The combination therapy outperformed pharmacological or exercise therapy alone. Among the various pharmacological agents combined with exercise, mesenchymal stem cell injection was ranked the best for short-term pain reduction (SMD: −1.53, 95% CI: −1.92 to −1.13, high certainty), followed by botulinum toxin A, dextrose, and platelet-rich plasma. For long-term pain relief, dextrose prolotherapy was the optimal (SMD: −1.76, 95% CI: −2.65 to −0.88, moderate certainty), followed by mesenchymal stem cells, platelet rich in growth factor, and platelet-rich plasma.

Conclusion

  • Exercise programs should be incorporated into clinical practice and trial design. For patients undergoing exercise therapies, mesenchymal stem cell, dextrose, platelet-rich plasma, platelet rich in growth factor, and botulinum toxin A may be the optimal agents.

Open access
Peter Richard Almeida University of the Witwatersrand, Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, Johannesburg, South Africa

Search for other papers by Peter Richard Almeida in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Lipalo Mokete University of the Witwatersrand, Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, Johannesburg, South Africa

Search for other papers by Lipalo Mokete in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Nkhodiseni Sikhauli University of the Witwatersrand, Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, Johannesburg, South Africa

Search for other papers by Nkhodiseni Sikhauli in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Ahmad Mota University of the Witwatersrand, Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, Johannesburg, South Africa

Search for other papers by Ahmad Mota in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Bayanda Ndindwa University of the Witwatersrand, Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, Johannesburg, South Africa

Search for other papers by Bayanda Ndindwa in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Jurek R T Pietrzak University of the Witwatersrand, Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, Johannesburg, South Africa

Search for other papers by Jurek R T Pietrzak in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

  • Total joint arthroplasty (TJA) is rising globally, with an associated increase in associated complications, necessitating increased efforts in prevention of these complications with pre-operative optimisation.

  • Malnutrition has been highlighted as one of the most important pre-operative modifiable risk factors to be addressed in TJA, with the term malnutrition in orthopaedic surgery having a broad definition that encompasses a wide range of nutritional abnormalities from undernutrition to overnutrition contributing to the outcomes of TJA.

  • Complications associated with malnutrition include periprosthetic joint infection (PJI), periprosthetic fracture, dislocations, aseptic loosening, anaemia, prolonged length of stay (LOS), increased mortality, and raised health care costs.

  • Standardised nutritional scoring tools, anthropometric measurements, and serological markers are all options available in pre-operative nutritional assessment in TJA, but there is no consensus yet regarding the standardisation of what parameters to assess and how to assess them.

  • Abnormal parameters identified using any of the assessment methods results in the diagnosis of malnutrition, and correction of these parameters of overnutrition or undernutrition have shown to improve outcomes in TJA.

  • With the multiple nutritional parameters contributing to the success of total joint arthroplasty, it is imperative that orthopaedic surgeon has a thorough knowledge regarding nutritional peri-operative optimisation in TJA.

Open access
Carsten Perka Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Charité Medical University Center, Berlin, Germany

Search for other papers by Carsten Perka in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Maziar Mohaddes Hässleholms Hospital, Region Skåne, Hässleholm, Sweden
Orthopedics, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden

Search for other papers by Maziar Mohaddes in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Luigi Zagra Hip Department, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Milan, Italy

Search for other papers by Luigi Zagra in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Axel Ekkernkamp BG Klinikum Unfallkrankenhaus Berlin gGmbH, Berlin, Germany
BG Kliniken – Klinikverbund der gesetzlichen Unfallversicherung gGmbH, Berlin, Germany

Search for other papers by Axel Ekkernkamp in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Niklas Keller Harding Center for Risk Literacy, University of Potsdam, Faculty of Health Sciences, Potsdam, Germany

Search for other papers by Niklas Keller in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Dirk Stengel BG Kliniken – Klinikverbund der gesetzlichen Unfallversicherung gGmbH, Berlin, Germany

Search for other papers by Dirk Stengel in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Purpose

  • To assess utility, benefits, and risks of 4th-generation alumina–zirconia ceramic pairings in elective total hip arthroplasty (THA).

Methods

  • A comprehensive mixed-methods best-evidence synthesis using data from systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials (RCTs), prospective and retrospective cohort studies, as well as joint replacement registries, was conducted to estimate overall revision and survival rates, periprosthetic infection, bearing fractures, and noise phenomena with 4th-generation alumina–zirconia ceramic versus other tribological couplings in elective THA. The systematic review part across multiple databases was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42023418076), and individual study data were extracted for statistical re-analysis.

Results

  • Twenty overlapping systematic reviews, 7, 17, and 8 references from RCTs, cohort studies, and joint replacement registries form the basis of this work. According to current best evidence, it is (i) 15–33 times more likely that 4th-generation alumina–zirconia pairings avoid a revision for infection than causing a revision for audible noise, (ii) 38–85 times more likely that 4th-generation alumina–zirconia pairings avoid a revision for infection than causing a revision for ceramic head fractures, and (iii) three to six times more likely that 4th-generation alumina–zirconia pairings avoid a revision for infection than cause a revision for ceramic liner fractures.

Conclusion

  • Fourth-generation alumina–zirconia pairings in THA show a favorable benefit–risk ratio, with rare compound-specific adverse events and complications significantly outbalanced by long-term advantages, such as a markedly lower incidence of revision for infection.

Open access
Gautier Beckers Department of Surgery, Hospital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Personalized Arthroplasty Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Search for other papers by Gautier Beckers in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Marc-Olivier Kiss Department of Surgery, Hospital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Personalized Arthroplasty Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Clinique Orthopédique Duval, Laval, Quebec, Canada

Search for other papers by Marc-Olivier Kiss in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Vincent Massé Department of Surgery, Hospital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Personalized Arthroplasty Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Clinique Orthopédique Duval, Laval, Quebec, Canada

Search for other papers by Vincent Massé in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Michele Malavolta Personalized Arthroplasty Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Department of Knee Surgery, Casa di Cura Solatrix, Rovereto, TN, Italy

Search for other papers by Michele Malavolta in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Pascal-André Vendittoli Department of Surgery, Hospital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Personalized Arthroplasty Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Clinique Orthopédique Duval, Laval, Quebec, Canada

Search for other papers by Pascal-André Vendittoli in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

  • Over the years, with a better understanding of knee anatomy and biomechanics, superior implant designs, advanced surgical techniques, and the availability of precision tools such as robotics and navigation, a more personalized approach to total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has emerged.

  • In the presence of extra-articular deformities, performing personalized TKA can be more challenging and specific considerations are required, since one has to deal with an acquired pathological anatomy.

  • Performing personalized TKA surgery in patients with extra-articular deformities, the surgeon can: (1) resurface the joint, omitting the extra-articular deformity; (2) partially compensate the extra-articular deformity with intra-articular correction (hybrid technique), or (3) correct the extra-articular deformity combined with a joint resurfacing TKA (single stage or two-stage procedure).

  • Omitting the acquired lower limb malalignment by resurfacing the knee has the advantages of respecting the joint surface anatomy and preserving soft tissue laxities. On the other hand, it maintains pathological joint load and lower limb kinematics with potentially detrimental outcomes.

  • The hybrid technique can be performed in most cases. It circumvents complications associated with osteotomies and brings lower limb axes closer to native alignment. On the other hand, it creates some intra-articular imbalances, which may require soft tissue releases and/or constrained implants.

  • Correcting the extra-articular deformity (through an osteotomy) in conjunction with joint resurfacing TKA represents the only true kinematic alignment technique, as it aims to reproduce native knee laxity and overall lower limb axis.

Open access
Felix Christoph Finger BG Klinik Tübingen, Department of Traumatology and Reconstructive Surgery, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany

Search for other papers by Felix Christoph Finger in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Steffen Schröter Diakonie Klinikum Jung-Stilling GmbH, Department of Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Siegen, Germany
Osteotomie Komitee der Deutschen Knie Gesellschaft (DKG), Munich, Germany

Search for other papers by Steffen Schröter in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Christoph Ihle BG Klinik Tübingen, Department of Traumatology and Reconstructive Surgery, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany

Search for other papers by Christoph Ihle in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Moritz Herbst BG Klinik Tübingen, Department of Traumatology and Reconstructive Surgery, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany

Search for other papers by Moritz Herbst in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Tina Histing BG Klinik Tübingen, Department of Traumatology and Reconstructive Surgery, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany

Search for other papers by Tina Histing in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Marc-Daniel Ahrend BG Klinik Tübingen, Department of Traumatology and Reconstructive Surgery, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany
Osteotomie Komitee der Deutschen Knie Gesellschaft (DKG), Munich, Germany
AO Research Institute Davos, Davos, Switzerland

Search for other papers by Marc-Daniel Ahrend in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

  • The present narrative review provides a summary of postoperative therapy modalities and their effectiveness following osteotomies around the knee.

  • The topics that are discussed in the scientific discourse include support of cartilage cell regeneration, pain management, drainage insertion, tourniquet use, pharmacological and mechanical thromboembolism prophylaxis, weight-bearing protocols and bone consolidation.

  • There is evidence for the use of pharmacological thromboembolism prophylaxis and weight-bearing protocols.

  • A standardized postoperative treatment concept following osteotomies around the knee cannot be derived due to lack of evidence for the other topics in current literature.

Open access
Bowen Lai Department of Orthopedics, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China

Search for other papers by Bowen Lai in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Heng Jiang Department of Orthopedics, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China

Search for other papers by Heng Jiang in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Yuan Gao Department of Orthopedics, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China

Search for other papers by Yuan Gao in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Xuhui Zhou Department of Orthopedics, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China

Search for other papers by Xuhui Zhou in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

  • Myositis ossificans (MO) is characterized by benign heterotopic ossificans in soft tissues like muscles, which can be classified into nonhereditary MO and fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP). Although MO has been studied for decades, no research reviewed and analyzed the features of publications in this field quantitatively and qualitatively.

  • Using bibliometrics tools (bibliometrix R package, VOSviewer, and CiteSpace), we conducted a bibliometric analysis of 1280 articles regarding MO in the Web of Science Core Collection database from 1993 to 2022.

  • The annual number of publications and related research areas in the MO field increased gradually in the past 20 years. The USA contributed the most percentage (42.58%) of articles. The University of Pennsylvania (UPenn) and the Journal Bone published the most articles among all institutions and journals. Kaplan FS and Shore EM from UPenn were the top two scholars who made the largest contributions to this field.

  • Keyword analysis showed that research hotspots changed from traumatic MO and clinical management of MO to the genetic etiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of FOP.

  • This study can provide new insights into the research trends of MO and helps researchers grasp and determine future study directions more easily.

Open access