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Ahmed Halloum Interdisciplinary Orthopaedics, Aalborg University Hospital, Hobrovej, Aalborg, Denmark

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Søren Kold Interdisciplinary Orthopaedics, Aalborg University Hospital, Hobrovej, Aalborg, Denmark

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Jan Duedal Rölfing Department of Orthopaedics, Aarhus University Hospital, Palle Juul-Jensens Boulevard, Aarhus, Denmark

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Ahmed A Abood Interdisciplinary Orthopaedics, Aalborg University Hospital, Hobrovej, Aalborg, Denmark
Department of Orthopaedics, Aarhus University Hospital, Palle Juul-Jensens Boulevard, Aarhus, Denmark

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Ole Rahbek Interdisciplinary Orthopaedics, Aalborg University Hospital, Hobrovej, Aalborg, Denmark

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Purpose

  • The objective of this scoping review was to describe the extent and type of evidence of using guided growth to correct rotational deformities of long bones in children.

Methods

  • This scoping review was conducted in accordance with the JBI methodology for scoping reviews. All published and unpublished studies investigating surgical methods using guided growth to perform gradual rotation of long bones were included.

Results

  • Fourteen studies were included: one review, three clinical studies, and ten preclinical studies. In the three clinical studies, three different surgical methods were used on 21 children. Some degree of rotation was achieved in all but two children. Adverse effects reported included limb length discrepancy (LLD), knee stiffness and rebound of rotation after removal of tethers. Of the ten preclinical studies, two were ex vivo and eight were in vivo. Rotation was achieved in all preclinical studies. Adverse effects reported included implant extrusions, LLD, articular deformities, joint stiffness and rebound of rotation after removal of tethers. Two of the studies reported on histological changes.

Conclusions

  • All studies conclude that guided growth is a potential treatment for rotational deformities of long bones. There is great variation in animal models and surgical methods used and in reported adverse effects. More research is needed to shed light on the best surgical guided growth method, its effectiveness as well as the involved risks and complications. Based on current evidence the procedure is still to be considered experimental.

Level of evidence

  • 4

Open access
Gema Chamorro-Moriana Department of Physiotherapy, Research Group “Area of Physiotherapy CTS-305”, University of Seville, Seville, Spain

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Veronica Perez-Cabezas Department of Nursing and Physiotherapy, Research Group MOVEIT (eMpOwering health by physical actiVity, Exercise and nutrition) CTS-1038, University of Cadiz, Cadiz, Spain

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Marisa Benitez-Lugo Department of Physiotherapy, Research Group “Area of Physiotherapy CTS-305”, University of Seville, Seville, Spain

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Purpose

  • The aim of the study was to analyze the effects of functional or biomechanical bandages, whether elastic or inelastic, in Chronic Ankle Instability (CAI).

Methods

  • This review used PubMed, WoS, SCOPUS, and CINAHL following PRISMA and registering in Prospero. Main PICOS: (1) CAI; (2) intervention, functional/biomechanical bandages; (3) comparison, taping effect versus placebo/no taping, or another functional taping; (4) outcomes, improvement of CAI functionality (dynamic/static balance, ankle kinematic, perception, agility and motor control, endurance and strength; (5) experimental and preexperimental studies. The meta-analyses considered mean and s.d. of the results per variable; effect size (ES) of each study and for each type of intervention. Homogeneity (Q), heterogeneity (H 2 and I 2), and 95% CI were calculated.

Results

  • In total, 28 studies were selected. Significant differences were found for dynamic balance (66.66%) and static balance (87.5%), ankle kinematics (75.00%), perceptions (88.88%), plantar flexor strength (100%), muscle activity (66.6%), endurance (100%), functional performance (100%), and gait (66.6%). The main results of meta-analyses (eight studies) are as follows – h/M ratio soleus, ES: 0.080, 95% CI: −5.219–5.379; h/M ratio peroneus, ES: 0.070, 95% CI: −6.151–6.291; posteromedial KT, ES: 0.042 95% CI: −0.514–0.598; posteromedial—overall, ES: −0.006 95% CI: −1.071–0.819; mSEBT-KT, ES: 0.057 95% CI: −0.281–0.395; mSEBT—overall, ES: −0.035 95% CI: −0.190–0.590.

Conclusions

  • All biomechanical or functional bandages, whether elastic or inelastic, applied in CAI were favorable, highlighting patient perception, dynamic and static balance, kinematics and agility and motor control, for its effectiveness and evidence. Thus, bandages increase ankle functionality. The meta-analyses found no statistical significance. Clinically, soleus muscle activity, h-reflex/M-responses using fibular reposition with rigid tape, and dynamic balance with combined kinesiotaping during the modified star excursion balance test and with the posteromedial direction found improvements.

Level of evidence

  • Level of evidence according to Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network: 1+. Level of evidence according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine 2011: 1.

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Yvet Mooiweer Department of Health Services Research, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg, Germany
Department of Orthopedics, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands

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Lina Roling School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg, Germany

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Margaret Vugrin Preston Smith Library, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lobbock, Texas, USA

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Lena Ansmann Department of Health Services Research, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg, Germany
Chair of Medical Sociology, Institute of Medical Sociology, Health Services Research and Rehabilitation Science (IMVR) Faculty of Medicine, University of Cologne, Oldenburg, Germany

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Martin Stevens Department of Orthopedics, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands

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Gesine H Seeber Department of Orthopedics, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
University Hospital of Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery Pius-Hospital, Medical Campus University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany

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Purpose

  • The association between preoperative expectations and treatment outcomes in total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is still unclear. Therefore the aim is to examine the association between preoperative outcome expectations, process expectations, and self-efficacy, and the postoperative outcomes overall outcome, pain, function, stiffness, satisfaction, and quality of life following THA/TKA.

Methods

  • A systematic review with narrative synthesis was conducted. PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and Cochrane Library were searched from inception to October 17, 2022. Included were prospective longitudinal cohort studies published in English, German, or Dutch, with an adult population undergoing THA/TKA, and including at least one measure of preoperative expectations and the postoperative outcomes mentioned earlier. Two independent reviewers screened the retrieved articles for eligibility, a third solved disagreements. Risk of bias (RoB) was assessed using the QUIPS tool.

Results

  • Of the 50 included studies, 38 had high RoB and 12 moderate RoB. Unadjusted results suggest a positive association between preoperative outcome expectations and overall outcome in the medium and long term, and between self-efficacy and change in ‘overall outcome’ in the long term. Adjusted results suggest positive associations between outcome expectations and function and between self-efficacy and overall outcome in the medium term, and for outcome expectations with pain and change in pain, respectively, and self-efficacy and stiffness in the long term.

Conclusions

  • Preoperative expectations show a possible positive association with specific outcome measures, such as pain or function. For future research, it is advised to link matching specific expectations with specific outcomes.

Open access
Guido Grappiolo IRCCS Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milan, Italy
Fondazione Livio Sciutto Onlus, Campus Savona - Università degli Studi di Genova, Via

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Edoardo Guazzoni IRCCS Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milan, Italy
Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, IRCCS Fondazione Policlinico San Matteo, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy

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Francesco Manlio Gambaro Fondazione Livio Sciutto Onlus, Campus Savona - Università degli Studi di Genova, Via
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, Pieve Emanuele, Milan, Italy

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Mattia Loppini IRCCS Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milan, Italy
Fondazione Livio Sciutto Onlus, Campus Savona - Università degli Studi di Genova, Via
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, Pieve Emanuele, Milan, Italy

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Hanna Wellauer Department of Orthopaedics, HFR Fribourg - Cantonal Hospital, Fribourg, Switzerland

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Roman Heuberger RMS Foundation, Bettlach, Switzerland

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Emanuel Gautier Department of Orthopaedics, HFR Fribourg - Cantonal Hospital, Fribourg, Switzerland

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Moritz Tannast Department of Orthopaedics, HFR Fribourg - Cantonal Hospital, Fribourg, Switzerland

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Hubert Steinke Institute for the History of Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland

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Peter Wahl Division of Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery, Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Winterthur, Switzerland

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Han Ling Tan Department of Orthopaedic Surgery (NOCERAL), Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

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Tunku Sara Ahmad Department of Orthopaedic Surgery (NOCERAL), Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

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C Sankara Kumar Department of Orthopaedic Surgery (NOCERAL), Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

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Yohan Khirusman Adnan Department of Orthopaedic Surgery (NOCERAL), Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

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Lai Meng Looi Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

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Jayaletchumi Gunasagaran Department of Orthopaedic Surgery (NOCERAL), Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

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  • Superficial acral fibromyxoma, also known as digital fibromyxoma, is a slow-growing, benign, solitary soft tissue tumor. First described in 2001 by Fetsch et al., it is a condition that often occurs in middle-aged individuals. However, it has also been reported across a wide range of ages, ranging from 4 to 86 years, with males more commonly reported. The condition often presents as solitary soft tissue swelling over the periungual or subungual.

  • We present the management experience of the rare presentation of this rare tumor and a detailed review of the past literature on this condition. Detailed management of the condition has been described, along with the outcome after 2 years of follow-up and treatment experience.

  • Our detailed analysis shows that 2 years is the shortest duration of follow-up to rule out recurrence. Hence, most of the cases reported earlier had given the false sense of the recurrence rate of the tumor, which could lead to undertreatment of the condition.

  • The purpose of this article is to allow the readers to understand better the tumor’s characteristics with bone involvement and the tumor's diagnostic strategies and treatment options.

Open access
Marc Saab CHU Lille, Orthopaedic and Traumatology Department, Hôpital Roger Salengro, Lille, France
University of Lille, INSERM, CHU Lille, U1008 – Advanced Drug Delivery Systems and Biomaterials, Lille, France

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Cédric Zobrist University of Lille, CNRS, INRAE, Centrale Lille, UMR 8207 – UMET – Unité Matériaux et Transformations, Lille, France

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Nicolas Blanchemain University of Lille, INSERM, CHU Lille, U1008 – Advanced Drug Delivery Systems and Biomaterials, Lille, France

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Bernard Martel University of Lille, CNRS, INRAE, Centrale Lille, UMR 8207 – UMET – Unité Matériaux et Transformations, Lille, France

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Feng Chai University of Lille, INSERM, CHU Lille, U1008 – Advanced Drug Delivery Systems and Biomaterials, Lille, France

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Purpose

  • The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic literature review analyzing the results of in vivo rat femoral defect models using biomaterials for improving the induced membrane technique (IMT).

Methods

  • Following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, the PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases were searched. Inclusion criteria were studies reporting results of the IMT in in vivo rat femoral critical-sized defect models using a biomaterial possibly combined with molecules. Methodologic quality was assessed with the Animal Research: Reporting In Vivo Experiments guidelines.

Results

  • Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria. Femoral stabilization with plate and screws was the most frequent. Histologic, biomechanical, and/or radiologic analyses were performed. In two-stage strategies, the PMMA spacer could be associated with bioactive molecules to enhance IM growth factor expression and improve bone formation. Modulating the roughness of spacers could increase IM thickness and accelerate its formation. In one-stage strategies, human tissue-derived membranes combined with bone grafting achieved bone formation comparable to a standard IMT. All calcium phosphate grafts seemed to require a functionalization with growth factors or bone marrow mononuclear cells to improve outcomes compared with non-functionalized grafts.

Conclusion

  • This systematic review described the main parameters of the in vivo rat femoral defect models using biomaterials to improve the induced membrane technique. Although the studies included had several methodological limitations that may limit the scope of these conclusions, one- and two-stage strategies reported promising results with biomaterials to improve the IMT.

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Pierre Hoffmeyer University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland

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Shaho Hasan Department of Orthopaedics, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands

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Peter van Schie Department of Orthopaedics, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands
Department of Biomedical Data Sciences, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands

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Bart L Kaptein Department of Orthopaedics, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands

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Jan W Schoones Walaeus Library, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands

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Perla J Marang-van de Mheen Department of Orthopaedics, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands
Department of Safety & Security Science, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands

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Rob G H H Nelissen Department of Orthopaedics, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands

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Background

  • Loosening is a major cause for failure of total hip and total knee arthroplasties (THAs/TKAs). Preemptive diagnostics of asymptomatic loosening could open strategies to prevent gross loosening. A multitude of biomarkers may discriminate between loosened and stable implants, but it is unknown which have the best performance. The present systematic review aimed to assess which biomarkers have shown the most promising results in discriminating between stable and aseptic loosened THAs and TKAs.

Methods

  • PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Academic Search Premier were systematically searched up to January 2020 for studies including THA/TKA and biomarkers to assess loosening. Two reviewers independently screened records, extracted data, and assessed the risk of bias using the ICROMS tool to classify the quality of the studies.

Results

  • Twenty-eight (three high-quality) studies were included, reporting on a median of 48 patients (interquartile range 28–69). Serum and urine markers were evaluated in 22 and 10 studies, respectively. Tumor necrosis factor α and osteocalcin were significantly higher in loosened compared with stable implants. Urinary N-terminal telopeptide had significantly elevated levels in loosened prostheses.

Conclusion

  • Several serum and urine markers were promising in discriminating between loosened and stable implants. We recommend future studies to evaluate these biomarkers in a longitudinal fashion to assess whether progression of loosening is associated with a change in these biomarkers. In particular, high-quality studies assessing the usability of these biomarkers are needed.

Open access