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Gautier Beckers Department of Surgery, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montréal University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
Personalized Arthroplasty Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Vincent Massé Department of Surgery, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montréal University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
Personalized Arthroplasty Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Clinique Orthopédique Duval, Laval, Quebec, Canada

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Pascal-André Vendittoli Department of Surgery, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montréal University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
Personalized Arthroplasty Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Clinique Orthopédique Duval, Laval, Quebec, Canada

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Mina W Morcos Department of Surgery, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montréal University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
Personalized Arthroplasty Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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  • Advanced hemophilic knee arthropathy is a frequent and devastating manifestation of severe hemophilia with significant implications for activities of daily living.

  • Hemophilic arthropathy is caused by repeated bleeding, resulting in joint degeneration, pain, deformity and disability.

  • In patients with hemophilia and advanced disease, total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has proven to be the most successful intervention, improves physical function and reduces knee pain.

  • Hemophilic patients carry additional risks for complications and required specific pre/postoperative considerations. Expert treatment center should be used to improve patient outcome.

  • Hemophilic patients present significant surgical challenges such as joint destruction, bone loss, severe ankylosis and oligoarticular involvement. The surgeon performing the arthroplasty must be experienced to manage such problems.

Open access
Angelika Ramesh Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, United Kingdom
Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, United Kingdom

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Anna Di Laura Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, United Kingdom
Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, United Kingdom

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Johann Henckel Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, United Kingdom

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Alister Hart Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, United Kingdom
Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Science, University College London, United Kingdom
Cleveland Clinic London, United Kingdom

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  • CT is the principal imaging modality used for the pre-operative 3D planning and assessment of total hip arthroplasty (THA).

  • The image quality offered by CT has a radiation penalty to the patient. Higher than necessary radiation exposure is of particular concern when imaging young patients and women of childbearing age, due to the greater risk of radiation-induced cancer in this group.

  • A harmonised low-dose CT protocol is needed, evidenced by the huge variability in the 17 protocols reviewed. The majority of the protocols were incomplete, leading to uncertainty among radiographers when performing the scans.

  • Only three protocols (20%) were optimised for both ‘field of view’ and image acquisition parameters. 10 protocols (60%) were optimised for ‘field of view’ only. These protocols included imaging of the relevant landmarks in the bony pelvis in addition to the knees – the reference for femoral anteversion.

  • CT parameters, including the scanner kilovoltage (kV), milliamperage–time product (mAs) and slice thickness, must be optimised with a ‘field of view’ that includes the relevant bony landmarks. The recommended kV and mAs values were very wide ranging from 100 to 150 and from 100 to 250, respectively.

  • The large variability that exists amongst the CT protocols illustrates the need for a more consistent low-dose CT protocol for the planning of THA. This must provide an optimal balance between image quality and radiation dose to the patient.

  • Current CT scanners do not allow for measurements of functional pelvic orientation and additional upright imaging modalities are needed to augment them.

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Heri Suroto Department of Orthopedic and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Airlangga/Dr. Soetomo General Academic Hospital, Surabaya, Indonesia

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Benedictus Anindita Satmoko Faculty of Medicine, Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

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Tabita Prajasari Department of Orthopedic and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Airlangga/Dr. Soetomo General Academic Hospital, Surabaya, Indonesia

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Brigita De Vega Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, Royal Free Hospital Campus, United Kingdom

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Teddy Heri Wardhana Department of Orthopedic and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Airlangga/Dr. Soetomo General Academic Hospital, Surabaya, Indonesia

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Steven K Samijo Department of Orthopedic and Traumatology, Zuyderland Medisch Centrum, Heerlen, Netherlands

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Purpose

  • The use of non-biodegradable suture anchors (NBSA) in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (RCR) has increased significantly. However, several complications such as migration, chondral damage, revision, and imaging difficulties have been reported. Meanwhile, the effectiveness of biodegradable suture anchors (BSA) in overcoming such complications and achieving functional outcomes requires further study. Thus, we aim to compare the clinical outcomes and complications of RCR using BSA and NBSA using direct comparison studies.

Methods

  • Two independent reviewers conducted systematic searches in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science from conception to September 2022. Using the RoB 2 and ROBINS-I tools, we assessed the included studies for bias. We applied GRADE to appraise our evidence. Our PROSPERO registration number is CRD42022354347.

Results

  • Six studies (two randomized controlled trials, one retrospective cohort, and three case–control studies) involving 423 patients were included (211 patients received BSA and 212 patients received NBSA). BSA was comparable to NBSA in forward flexion, abduction, external rotation, Constant–Murley score, and perianchor cyst formation (P = 0.97, 0.81, 0.56, 0.29, and 0.56, respectively). Retear rates were slightly higher while tendon healing was reduced in BSA compared to NBSA, but the differences were not significant (P = 0.35 and 0.35, respectively).

Conclusion

  • BSA and NBSA appear to yield similar shoulder functions and complications in rotator cuff repairs.

Open access
Pududu Archie Rachuene Department of Surgery, Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa

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Roopam Dey Department of Surgery, Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa
Department of Human Biology, Division of Biomedical Engineering, University of Cape Town, South Africa

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Sudesh Sivarasu Department of Surgery, Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa
Department of Human Biology, Division of Biomedical Engineering, University of Cape Town, South Africa

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Jean-Pierre du Plessis Department of Surgery, Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa

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Stephen Roche Department of Surgery, Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa

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Basil Vrettos Department of Surgery, Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa

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  • Structural glenoid defects are common during primary reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) and are often associated with poor outcomes.

  • The lack of pre-operative imaging protocols for determining the depth and degree of glenoid wear hinders our ability to accurately plan and correct these defects.

  • Although bone grafting has been reported to be effective in reducing glenoid wear during RSA, there is limited information on when to utilise it and how to prepare the graft.

  • We conducted this review to assess the evidence for the management of glenoid defects, with an emphasis on bone grafts to treat structural glenoid bone loss in primary RSA patients.

Open access
Maciej Otworowski Idea Ortopedia, Warsaw, Poland

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Dariusz Grzelecki Department of Orthopedics and Rheumoorthopedics, Centre of Postgraduate Medical Education, Otwock, Poland

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Krzysztof Starszak Department of Human Anatomy, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland

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Andrzej Boszczyk Trauma and Orthopedics Department, Centre of Posgraduate Medical Education, Otwock, Poland

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Mateusz Piorunek Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland

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Bartłomiej Kordasiewicz Idea Ortopedia, Warsaw, Poland
Trauma and Orthopedics Department, Centre of Posgraduate Medical Education, Otwock, Poland

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Purpose

  • The goal of this study was to review available literature on periprosthetic shoulder fractures to evaluate epidemiology, risk factors and support clinical decision-making regarding diagnostics, preoperative planning, and treatment options.

Methods

  • Two authors cross-checked the PubMed and Web of Science medical databases. The inclusion criteria were as follows: original human studies published in English, with the timeframe not limited, and the following keywords were used: ‘periprosthetic shoulder fracture,’ ‘total shoulder arthroplasty periprosthetic fractures,’ ‘total shoulder arthroplasty fracture,’ and ‘total shoulder replacement periprosthetic fracture.’ Seventy articles were included in the review. All articles were retrieved using the aforementioned criteria.

Results

  • The fracture rate associated with total shoulder arthroplasty varied between 0 and 47.6%. Risk factors for periprosthetic fractures were female gender, body mass index < 25 kg/m2, smoking, rheumatoid arthritis, and Parkinson’s disease. The most commonly used classification is the Wright and Coefield classification. Periprosthetic fractures can be treated both, conservatively and operatively.

Conclusion

  • Periprosthetic fracture frequency after shoulder arthroplasty ranges from 0 to 47.6%. The most common location of the fracture is the humerus and most commonly occurs intraoperatively. The most important factor influencing treatment is stem stability. Fractures with stem instability require revision arthroplasty with stem replacement. Fractures with a stable stem depending on the location, displacement and bone stock quality can be treated both conservatively and operatively. For internal fixation plates with cables and screws are most commonly used.

Open access
Valentina Viglione Clinica Ortopedica e Traumatologica 1 IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy

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Angelo Boffa Applied and Translational Research (ATR) Center, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy

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Davide Previtali Department of Surgery, EOC, Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Lugano, Switzerland

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Francesca Vannini Clinica Ortopedica e Traumatologica 1 IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy

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Cesare Faldini Clinica Ortopedica e Traumatologica 1 IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy

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Giuseppe Filardo Applied and Translational Research (ATR) Center, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy
Department of Surgery, EOC, Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Lugano, Switzerland
Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Università della Svizzera Italiana, Lugano, Switzerland

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Purpose

  • The study of the placebo effect is key to elucidate the ‘real effect’ of conservative interventions for plantar fasciitis. The aim of this meta-analysis was to quantify the impact of placebo in the different conservative treatments of plantar fasciitis.

Methods

  • A systematic literature review was performed on double-blind placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) according to PRISMA guidelines on PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. The meta-analysis primary outcome was the 0–10 pain variation after placebo treatments analyzed at 1 week, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. The risk of bias was assessed using the RoB 2.0 tool, while the overall quality of evidence was graded according to the GRADE guidelines.

Results

  • The placebo effect for conservative treatments was studied in 42 double-blind RCTs on 1724 patients. The meta-analysis of VAS pain showed a statistically significant improvement after placebo administration of 2.13/10 points (P < 0.001), being highest at 12 months with 2.79/10 points (P < 0.001). The improvement of the placebo groups was higher in the extracorporeal shock wave therapy studies compared to the injection studies (2.59 vs 1.78; P = 0.05). Eight studies had a low risk of bias, 23 studies had ‘some concerns,’ and 4 studies had a high risk of bias. The GRADE evaluation showed an overall high quality of evidence.

Conclusion

  • This systematic review and meta-analysis demonstrated that the placebo effect represents an important component of all conservative approaches to treat plantar fasciitis. This effect is statistically and clinically significant, increases over time, and depends on the type of conservative treatment applied to address plantar fasciitis.

Open access
Francisca Gámiz-Bermúdez Unidad de Gestión Clínica Adra, Distrito Sanitario Poniente de Almería, Avenida Picasso, Adra, Spain

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Alfonso Javier Ibáñez-Vera Department of Health Sciences, University of Jaen, Jaen, Spain

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Esteban Obrero-Gaitán Department of Health Sciences, University of Jaen, Jaen, Spain

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Irene Cortés-Pérez Department of Health Sciences, University of Jaen, Jaen, Spain

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Noelia Zagalaz-Anula Department of Health Sciences, University of Jaen, Jaen, Spain

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Rafael Lomas-Vega Department of Health Sciences, University of Jaen, Jaen, Spain

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Purpose

  • The objective of this systematic review was to assess a possible relationship between stomatognathic alterations and idiopathic scoliosis (IS).

Design

  • This study is a systematic review with meta-analysis of observational studies.

Methods

  • The protocol of this systematic review with meta-analysis was registered in PROSPERO (CRD42022370593). A bibliographic search was carried out in the Pubmed (MEDLINE), Scopus, Web of Science and CINAHL databases using the MeSH terms ‘Scoliosis’ and ‘Stomatognathic Disease’. The odds ratio (OR) of prevalence and standardized mean difference (SMD) were used to synthesize the results.

Results

  • Of 1592 studies located, 14 studies were selected with 3018 subjects (age: 13.9 years). IS was related to Angle’s class II (OR = 2.052, 95% CI = 1.236–3.406) and crossbite (OR = 2.234, 95% CI = 1.639–3.045). Patients with malocclusion showed a higher prevalence of IS than controls (OR = 4.633, 95% CI = 1.467–14.628), and subjects with IS showed high overjet (SMD = 0.405, 95% CI = 0.149–0.661) and greater dysfunction due to temporomandibular disorders (SMD = 1.153, 95% CI = 0.780–1.527).

Conclusion

  • Compared with healthy controls, subjects with IS have twice the risk of suffering from occlusion disorders, present greater temporomandibular dysfunction and have a greater overjet in the incisors. Moreover, subjects with malocclusion have an IS prevalence up to four times higher. The systematic orofacial examination of patients with IS should be recommended.

Open access
Yangqi Xu Department of Surgery, Melbourne Medical School, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Melbourne, Australia

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Tony B Huang Department of Surgery, Melbourne Medical School, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Melbourne, Australia

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Michael A Schuetz Jamieson Trauma Institute, Metro North Hospital and Health Service, Queensland Health, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

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Peter F M Choong Department of Surgery, Melbourne Medical School, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Melbourne, Australia
Department of Orthopaedics, St. Vincent’s Hospital, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia

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the ICARAUS group
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the ICARAUS group

  • Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is one of the most devastating complications for a patient following arthroplasty.

  • This scoping review aims to evaluate the burden of PJI on individual patients and the healthcare system regarding the mortality rate, patient-reported quality of life, and healthcare resource utilisation.

  • Patients with PJI have up to a five-fold higher mortality rate than those who have undergone an uninfected primary arthroplasty. There is an increased use of ambulatory aids and reduced joint function scores in patients with PJI. Global quality of life is poorer, specifically measured by the EQ-5D. Direct hospitalisation costs are two- to five-fold higher, attributed to surgery and prostheses, antibiotics, and a prolonged inpatient stay.

  • There is an immense clinical and health economic burden secondary to PJI worldwide. This is expected to rise exponentially due to the increasing number of primary procedures and an ageing population with comorbidities

  • Improving preventative and treatment strategies is imperative for patients and the healthcare system.

Open access
Hua Luo Department of Orthopedics, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

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Congcong He Department of Psychology, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

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Yong Zhao Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Fengxian District Central Hospital, Shanghai, China

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Guangyong Yang Department of Orthopedics, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

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Hainan Hong Department of Orthopedics, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Taizhou, Zhejiang, China

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Purpose

  • Septic arthritis (SA) is an intra-articular infection caused by purulent bacteria and the only effective method is surgical intervention. Two-stage arthroplasty is considered the gold standard treatment for SA, but recent studies have found that single-stage arthroplasty can achieve the same efficacy as two-stage arthroplasty. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of single- vs two-stage arthroplasty in the treatment of (acute or quiescent) SA.

Methods

  • The review process was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Medline, and Cochrane Library databases to identify all literature on the treatment of SA using single- and two-stage arthroplasty from the date of database inception to November 10, 2022. Data on reinfection rates were expressed as odds ratios and 95% CIs.

Results

  • Seven retrospective studies with a total of 413 patients were included. Pooled analysis showed no difference in the reinfection rate between single- and two-stage arthroplasty. Subgroup analysis found no difference between the single- and two-stage arthroplasty groups in the incidence of purulent infection of the hip and knee. Cumulative meta-analysis showed gradual stabilization of outcomes.

Conclusions

  • Based on our meta-analysis of available retrospective studies, we found no significant difference in reinfection rates between single- and two-stage arthroplasty for SA. Further prospective cohort studies are needed to confirm our results, although our meta-analysis provides important insights into the current literature on this topic.

Open access
Shu-Hao Du Department of Sport Rehabilitation, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Shanghai University of Medicine and Health Sciences Affiliated Zhoupu Hospital, Shanghai, China

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Yong-Hui Zhang Department of Sport Rehabilitation, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China

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Qi-Hao Yang Department of Sport Rehabilitation, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China

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Yu-Chen Wang Department of Sport Rehabilitation, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China

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Yu Fang Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Shanghai University of Medicine and Health Sciences Affiliated Zhoupu Hospital, Shanghai, China

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Xue-Qiang Wang Department of Sport Rehabilitation, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Shanghai University of Medicine and Health Sciences Affiliated Zhoupu Hospital, Shanghai, China

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  • Postural assessment can help doctors and therapists identify risk factors for low back pain and determine appropriate follow-up treatment.

  • Postural alignment is not perfectly symmetrical, and small asymmetries can instead represent norms and criteria for postural evaluation.

  • It is necessary to comprehensively observe patients’ posture in all directions and analyze the factors related to posture evaluation.

  • The results of reliability show that in general intra-rater reliability is higher than inter-rater reliability, and inclinometers are being more reliable than other instrumentations.

  • Some common postural problems can cause lumbar discomfort, and prolonged poor posture is a potential risk factor for lumbar spine injuries.

  • On the basis of previous studies on posture evaluation, a unified standardized method for posture evaluation must be established in future research.

Open access